Horror Grinder

Horror Movies Horror Books Horror News

Hell’s Breaking Loose in These New JeruZalem Clips

Posted by Gareth Jones on March 24, 2016

Apocalyptic found footage horror JeruAalem hits VOD in the UK this March 28 (with the UK DVD release to follow on April 4) courtesy of Solo Media & Matchbox Films — and to celebrate, we’ve got a couple of new clips that demonstrate the flick’s “Demons Gone Wild” approach. Enjoy!

JeruZalem (review) is written and directed By The Paz Brothers and stars Yael Grobglas, Yon Tumarkin, Danielle Jadelyn and Tom Graziani.

Synopsis:
There are three gates to Hell. One in the desert… One in the ocean… And one in… JERUZALEM. On Judgement Day, Hell shall inherit the Earth…

Two American girls on vacation follow a mysterious anthropology student on a trip to Jerusalem. The party is cut short when the trio are caught in the middle of a biblical apocalypse. Trapped between the ancient walls of the holy city, the three travelers must survive long enough to find a way out as the fury of Hell is unleashed upon them.

Jeruzalem UK DVD Sleeve

The post Hell’s Breaking Loose in These New JeruZalem Clips appeared first on Dread Central.

Hell’s Breaking Loose in These New JeruZalem Clips

Posted by Gareth Jones on March 24, 2016

Apocalyptic found footage horror JeruAalem hits VOD in the UK this March 28 (with the UK DVD release to follow on April 4) courtesy of Solo Media & Matchbox Films — and to celebrate, we’ve got a couple of new clips that demonstrate the flick’s “Demons Gone Wild” approach. Enjoy!

JeruZalem (review) is written and directed By The Paz Brothers and stars Yael Grobglas, Yon Tumarkin, Danielle Jadelyn and Tom Graziani.

Synopsis:
There are three gates to Hell. One in the desert… One in the ocean… And one in… JERUZALEM. On Judgement Day, Hell shall inherit the Earth…

Two American girls on vacation follow a mysterious anthropology student on a trip to Jerusalem. The party is cut short when the trio are caught in the middle of a biblical apocalypse. Trapped between the ancient walls of the holy city, the three travelers must survive long enough to find a way out as the fury of Hell is unleashed upon them.

Jeruzalem UK DVD Sleeve

The post Hell’s Breaking Loose in These New JeruZalem Clips appeared first on Dread Central.

The Foundation of Peace Is Ablaze: Is JeruZalem the Latest Awesome Found Footage Flick?

Posted by Matt Molgaard on February 3, 2016

There’s no need to stretch truths or attempt to invest in something that isn’t genuinely existent, so we’re not going to tell you that JeruZalem is a perfect film; it’s not. The picture has a few editing issues (it could be simple post-production design, but eyeing things, I personally believe it’s a maneuver to disguise rough moments in the editing process), and the frequent “facial recognition” (something that the recently released Indigenous also utilizes) pop-ups in the image are a bit annoying, but outside of these two noticeable problems, JeruZalem makes for pretty smooth sailing and brings something that feels genuinely new to the screen.

For a found footage feature this seems nearly inconceivable, and that’s part of what makes the picture so endearing: It works where it shouldn’t… and it’s wicked fun.

The story sees a handful of random tourists (within the entire group there are small, already united groups that gather to create the complete ensemble) come together in Jerusalem for fast-paced fun and some hard drinking. And things go well, until all hell breaks loose in Jerusalem. Literally, Hell breaks loose and flames erupt in what was known as the “foundation of peace” before Judah’s men set it ablaze. We see glimpses of wings passing overhead, and anyone watching the film who hasn’t tuned in to the trailers (myself included) and still imagery in advance will likely begin scratching his/her head. What the hell is this? It’s what you didn’t expect. It’s something quite atypical of found footage features, which tend to pride themselves on believable root concepts (possessions, serial killers, and of course, the oft-discussed paranormal activities of the world). There isn’t much in the way of believability when it comes to winged monsters with infectious bites.

JeruZalem is man versus zombie-demon. But these zombie-demons don’t present themselves in the form of simple, spiritually overtaken human bodies, as any other possession piece would. These are actual demons, sans those who are physically attacked and subsequently transformed into winged monstrosities from the flaming depths. And plenty of said attacks occur, all while hordes of demons fly and stomp their way through the city, unleashing fury at every turn.

Our tourists, caught up in the insanity of it all, attempt to escape this city by any means necessary, even if it means taking to subterranean depths, where more creatures could be waiting in the darkness. With a little unexpected help (that ties up a semi-neglected subplot, that, even if somewhat disregarded at times, feels like it works relatively well), someone will indeed escape the city, but, as it turns out, leaving Jerusalem could create an unforeseen problem.

The monster designs in the flick are awesome. It’s a blend of digital effects and practical effects, with an emphasis on digital. Typically I’m not a fan of computer-generated imagery, but in this case the angle works. The Paz Brothers (Doran and Yoav) do an excellent job of entertaining the audience without thrusting the beasts into our faces relentlessly. There’s a fine line to be walked when it comes to monster movies; it’s easy to show too much or too little. If anything, the Paz Brothers may show us too little, though that’s debatable. Personally, I think they handled it right. We get to see some cool antagonists, but only in controlled bursts in the final act.

The first two acts are spent developing the characters, who are, characteristically, likable personalities. Clichés are generally steered clear of. We don’t have to worry about the expected ultra-douchebag, super slut (the one overly “friendly” girl in the film isn’t at all who you’d predict), and obvious final girl showing up. Some personalities are louder and more pronounced than others, but there are no painfully obnoxious individuals in the lineup. There are also a few tricks played on the audience, as we’re taken down a path that suggests deception by a few prominent players, only to learn we’ve read them entirely wrong. That’s a nice touch that doesn’t seem to be the norm in these films. A lot of found footage flicks paint one-dimensional individuals as the “in” thing, but JeruZalem dares to do something very different.

The picture, even if not action-laden in the early portions, moves well because we’re engaged in what our featured figures are enduring. And that scope of personality type is broad. We’ve got calm, collected individuals; pent-up people ready to burst from their reserved lifestyles; and flamboyant individuals brimming with confidence. And each character seems to exhibit interesting quirks. We’ve got a little bit of everything here, which in turn propels the story forward even in the downtime. It’s a nice adjustment in the landscape of the sub-genre.

As already noted, there are a few obvious problems with the film as a whole. The cons, however, do not outweigh the pros. There are wonders in store for the viewer, and that elevates the entire production above the majority of the pack. We’ve all been waiting for a different hand-held horror, and two entirely unexpected individuals have managed to deliver it. You may not know the name Paz, but you likely will in the future. Creating one of the five most entertaining found footage films to be released in the last nine years (in my opinion, Creep, Existence, Trollhunter, and Paranormal Activity are the only other films of its kind to really ignite serious stimulation since 2007) should work magic for this promising duo.

jeruzalem

The post The Foundation of Peace Is Ablaze: Is JeruZalem the Latest Awesome Found Footage Flick? appeared first on Dread Central.

The Foundation of Peace Is Ablaze: Is JeruZalem the Latest Awesome Found Footage Flick?

Posted by Matt Molgaard on February 3, 2016

There’s no need to stretch truths or attempt to invest in something that isn’t genuinely existent, so we’re not going to tell you that JeruZalem is a perfect film; it’s not. The picture has a few editing issues (it could be simple post-production design, but eyeing things, I personally believe it’s a maneuver to disguise rough moments in the editing process), and the frequent “facial recognition” (something that the recently released Indigenous also utilizes) pop-ups in the image are a bit annoying, but outside of these two noticeable problems, JeruZalem makes for pretty smooth sailing and brings something that feels genuinely new to the screen.

For a found footage feature this seems nearly inconceivable, and that’s part of what makes the picture so endearing: It works where it shouldn’t… and it’s wicked fun.

The story sees a handful of random tourists (within the entire group there are small, already united groups that gather to create the complete ensemble) come together in Jerusalem for fast-paced fun and some hard drinking. And things go well, until all hell breaks loose in Jerusalem. Literally, Hell breaks loose and flames erupt in what was known as the “foundation of peace” before Judah’s men set it ablaze. We see glimpses of wings passing overhead, and anyone watching the film who hasn’t tuned in to the trailers (myself included) and still imagery in advance will likely begin scratching his/her head. What the hell is this? It’s what you didn’t expect. It’s something quite atypical of found footage features, which tend to pride themselves on believable root concepts (possessions, serial killers, and of course, the oft-discussed paranormal activities of the world). There isn’t much in the way of believability when it comes to winged monsters with infectious bites.

JeruZalem is man versus zombie-demon. But these zombie-demons don’t present themselves in the form of simple, spiritually overtaken human bodies, as any other possession piece would. These are actual demons, sans those who are physically attacked and subsequently transformed into winged monstrosities from the flaming depths. And plenty of said attacks occur, all while hordes of demons fly and stomp their way through the city, unleashing fury at every turn.

Our tourists, caught up in the insanity of it all, attempt to escape this city by any means necessary, even if it means taking to subterranean depths, where more creatures could be waiting in the darkness. With a little unexpected help (that ties up a semi-neglected subplot, that, even if somewhat disregarded at times, feels like it works relatively well), someone will indeed escape the city, but, as it turns out, leaving Jerusalem could create an unforeseen problem.

The monster designs in the flick are awesome. It’s a blend of digital effects and practical effects, with an emphasis on digital. Typically I’m not a fan of computer-generated imagery, but in this case the angle works. The Paz Brothers (Doran and Yoav) do an excellent job of entertaining the audience without thrusting the beasts into our faces relentlessly. There’s a fine line to be walked when it comes to monster movies; it’s easy to show too much or too little. If anything, the Paz Brothers may show us too little, though that’s debatable. Personally, I think they handled it right. We get to see some cool antagonists, but only in controlled bursts in the final act.

The first two acts are spent developing the characters, who are, characteristically, likable personalities. Clichés are generally steered clear of. We don’t have to worry about the expected ultra-douchebag, super slut (the one overly “friendly” girl in the film isn’t at all who you’d predict), and obvious final girl showing up. Some personalities are louder and more pronounced than others, but there are no painfully obnoxious individuals in the lineup. There are also a few tricks played on the audience, as we’re taken down a path that suggests deception by a few prominent players, only to learn we’ve read them entirely wrong. That’s a nice touch that doesn’t seem to be the norm in these films. A lot of found footage flicks paint one-dimensional individuals as the “in” thing, but JeruZalem dares to do something very different.

The picture, even if not action-laden in the early portions, moves well because we’re engaged in what our featured figures are enduring. And that scope of personality type is broad. We’ve got calm, collected individuals; pent-up people ready to burst from their reserved lifestyles; and flamboyant individuals brimming with confidence. And each character seems to exhibit interesting quirks. We’ve got a little bit of everything here, which in turn propels the story forward even in the downtime. It’s a nice adjustment in the landscape of the sub-genre.

As already noted, there are a few obvious problems with the film as a whole. The cons, however, do not outweigh the pros. There are wonders in store for the viewer, and that elevates the entire production above the majority of the pack. We’ve all been waiting for a different hand-held horror, and two entirely unexpected individuals have managed to deliver it. You may not know the name Paz, but you likely will in the future. Creating one of the five most entertaining found footage films to be released in the last nine years (in my opinion, Creep, Existence, Trollhunter, and Paranormal Activity are the only other films of its kind to really ignite serious stimulation since 2007) should work magic for this promising duo.

jeruzalem

The post The Foundation of Peace Is Ablaze: Is JeruZalem the Latest Awesome Found Footage Flick? appeared first on Dread Central.

New JeruZalem Clip Gets Graphic

Posted by Steve Barton on January 18, 2016

A new clip from the zombie flick JeruZalem (review) has arrived via Entertainment Weekly, and we have it for you here. Dig it!

JeruZalem Release Details:
Epic Pictures Releasing will release the acclaimed award-winning Israeli horror film JeruZalem on January 22, 2016. The film, which was shot on location in Israel, world premiered at the 2015 Fantasia International Film Festival and, among other awards, was recognized with the Audience Award and Best Editing Award at the 2015 Jerusalem Film Festival.

A unique, point-of-view style horror film directed by Doron and Yoav Paz, JeruZalem follows Rachel (played by “Jane the Virgin” star Yael Grobglas), and her friend Sarah (Danielle Jadelyn), two American girls on vacation in Jerusalem. The two follow Kevin (Yon Tumarkin), a mysterious and handsome anthropology student, into the heart of the Old City. The party is cut short when a biblical prophecy comes to pass on the night of Yom Kippur and Jerusalem’s gate to hell is opened, releasing an epic apocalypse. Trapped between the ancient walls of the holy city, the trio must survive long enough to find a way out as the fury of hell is unleashed upon them.

Shooting on location amongst the monuments of Jerusalem’s Old City, The Paz Brothers directed the film utilizing a custom-made camera mount to capture some of the holy’s city’s ancient architecture, religious landmarks, and historical sites. The film features extensive point-of-view footage, shown from the perspective of Sarah’s Google Glass-type smart eyewear, as she uses the glasses’ GPS, facial recognition, and other apps to navigate the city and identify potentially threatening strangers.

“The Paz Brothers’ first feature, Phobidilia, premiered at the Toronto Film Festival and was the Israeli film that ignited the genre wave from that country. With their second feature, JeruZalem, they have created a remarkable, cinematic film that demands to be seen in theaters,” commented Epic Pictures CEO Patrick Ewald. “We’re thrilled to bring the film to audiences across the country.”

Epic Pictures Co-Founder Shaked Berenson added, “With remarkable access to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, the Via Dolorosa, the Western Wall, and other ancient, religious monuments typically prohibited to filmmakers, JeruZalem brings to the big screen never-seen-before sites and explores the not-so-typical underbelly of the old city.”

JeruZalem is produced by Doron and Yoav Paz and executive producers Shaked Berenson and Patrick Ewald of Epic Pictures. Co-producers are Rotem Levin, Nir Miretzky, Boris Zeleny, and Uri Levanon.

jeruzalem

The post New JeruZalem Clip Gets Graphic appeared first on Dread Central.

Epic Heads to JeruZalem; Releases New Trailer

Posted by Steve Barton on November 24, 2015

The zombie flick JeruZalem (review) has been acquired by Epic Pictures, and to celebrate their latest get, a new trailer has shambled our way! Dig it!

From the Press Release:
Epic Pictures Releasing will release the acclaimed award-winning Israeli horror film JeruZalem on January 22, 2016. The announcement was made today by Epic Pictures Group CEO Patrick Ewald and Co-Founder Shaked Berenson, who also financed the film, which was shot on location in Israel. The film world premiered at the 2015 Fantasia International Film Festival and, among other awards, was recognized with the Audience Award and Best Editing Award at the 2015 Jerusalem Film Festival.

A unique, point-of-view style horror film directed by Doron and Yoav Paz, JeruZalem follows Rachel (played by “Jane the Virgin” star Yael Grobglas), and her friend Sarah (Danielle Jadelyn), two American girls on vacation in Jerusalem. The two follow Kevin (Yon Tumarkin), a mysterious and handsome anthropology student, into the heart of the Old City. The party is cut short when a biblical prophecy comes to pass on the night of Yom Kippur and Jerusalem’s gate to hell is opened, releasing an epic apocalypse. Trapped between the ancient walls of the holy city, the trio must survive long enough to find a way out as the fury of hell is unleashed upon them.

Shooting on location amongst the monuments of Jerusalem’s Old City, The Paz Brothers directed the film utilizing a custom-made camera mount to capture some of the holy’s city’s ancient architecture, religious landmarks, and historical sites. The film features extensive point-of-view footage, shown from the perspective of Sarah’s Google Glass-type smart eyewear, as she uses the glasses’ GPS, facial recognition, and other apps to navigate the city and identify potentially threatening strangers.

“The Paz Brothers’ first feature, Phobidilia, premiered at the Toronto Film Festival and was the Israeli film that ignited the genre wave from that country. With their second feature, JeruZalem, they have created a remarkable, cinematic film that demands to be seen in theaters,” commented Epic Pictures CEO Patrick Ewald. “We’re thrilled to bring the film to audiences across the country.”

Epic Pictures Co-Founder Shaked Berenson added, “With remarkable access to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, the Via Dolorosa, the Western Wall, and other ancient, religious monuments typically prohibited to filmmakers, JeruZalem brings to the big screen never-seen-before sites and explores the not-so-typical underbelly of the old city.”

JeruZalem is produced by Doron and Yoav Paz and executive producers Shaked Berenson and Patrick Ewald of Epic Pictures. Co-producers are Rotem Levin, Nir Miretzky, Boris Zeleny, and Uri Levanon.

jeruzalem

The post Epic Heads to JeruZalem; Releases New Trailer appeared first on Dread Central.

Fantasia 2015: Visit Jeruzalem via this Festival Trailer

Posted by Debi Moore on May 6, 2015

This morning we learned that the Israeli film Jeruzalem will be having its World Premiere at the 2015 Fantasia International Film Festival, and to make sure you keep it on your radar, the movie’s first trailer has arrived.

Jeruzalem hails from the acclaimed Israeli filmmaking team of Yoav and Doron Paz. Starring Yael Grobglas (“Jane the Virgin,” Rabies) and told entirely from the perspective of a character’s increasingly battered Digital Glass headset, Jeruzalem offers whiplashing sights never before seen and will have audiences frozen in their seats when it premieres at Fantasia this summer. Yon Tumarkin, Tom Graziani, and Danielle Jadelyn co-star.

Synopsis:
Two American girls on vacation follow a mysterious and handsome anthropology student on a trip to Jerusalem. The party is cut short when the trio are caught in the middle of a biblical apocalypse. Trapped between the ancient walls of the holy city, the three travelers must survive long enough to find a way out as the fury of hell is unleashed upon them.

jeruzalem

The post Fantasia 2015: Visit Jeruzalem via this Festival Trailer appeared first on Dread Central.

The Selection Casts a New Character Who Doesn’t Appear in the Book

Posted by The Woman In Black on March 15, 2013

Ben Aldridge - The Selection Casts a New Character Who Doesn't Appear in the BookMore casting news has come in for The CW's pilot "The Selection," and it sounds like they are diverging from the source material a bit by adding an entirely new character. Read on for the details.

Deadline broke the news that British actor Ben Aldridge ("Lark Rise to Candleford," "The Bible") will play Prince Rafe, the younger brother of Prince Maxon (Michael Malarkey), who loves his country and takes his leadership role seriously — but has a secret. What's interesting is that, as MTV pointed out, in Kiera Cass' dystopian novel, upon which the potential series is based, Prince Maxon is an only child.

"The Selection" is set 300 years in the future and is about 35 working-class young women who are chosen via a lottery to participate in a competition for the Royal Prince Maxon's hand in marriage, which would make the winner the new queen, all while a growing rebellion threatens to crush the crown.

The pilot was (re)written by Elizabeth Craft and Sarah Fain; Warner Brothers is producing.

VISIT THE EVILSHOP @ AMAZON!
Got news? Click here to submit it!
Battle others for the prince's hand in marriage in the comments section below.

The CW Selects Israeli Actress Yael Grobglas for The Selection

Posted by The Woman In Black on February 22, 2013

The CW Selects Israeli Actress Yael Grobglas for The SelectionThe CW has been trying to get its Hunger Games-esque "The Selection" on the air since last year's pilot season, and now that they have a retooled script for this year, they've hired a new lead actress. Read on for the details.

Per Deadline, Israeli actress Yael Grobglas has landed the sought-after role of America Singer in The CW's "The Selection." Unknown to US audiences, Grobglas previously toplined the Israeli series "Tanuhi" ("Give it a Rest") and appeared in the film Kalevet (Rabies).

Last year the part was played by Aimee Teegarden ("Friday Night Lights"), but she's tied up with another CW pilot this year, "Oxygen."

The pilot was (re)written by Elizabeth Craft and Sarah Fain based on the book by Kiera Cass. "The Selection" is set 300 years in the future and is about 35 working-class young women who are chosen via a lottery to participate in a competition for the Royal Prince's hand in marriage, which would make the winner the new queen. Our heroine is forced to balance loyalty to family, true love, and kingdom as she tries to stay true to herself in the cutthroat competition, all while a growing rebellion threatens to crush the crown. Warner Brothers is producing.

VISIT THE EVILSHOP @ AMAZON!
Got news? Click here to submit it!
Battle others for the prince's hand in marriage in the comments section below.